Scaramucci Says Don't Rule Out Beltway Return - NBC Southern California
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's presidency

Scaramucci Says Don't Rule Out Beltway Return

"At some point I'll probably be more involved from the outside, but more in a re-election capability than from inside the administration," Anthony Scaramucci says

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Scaramucci Says Don't Rule Out Beltway Return
    AP Photo/Ariel Schalit
    Former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci poses for a photograph after an interview with the Associated Press in Jerusalem, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017. Scaramucci told The Associated Press on Monday that although he has not spoken to Donald Trump in over a month, he talks to the president's inner circle "regularly" and considers himself a media "surrogate" for the administration.

    Washington may not have seen the last of "The Mooch."

    Anthony Scaramucci, the short-lived White House communications chief who was forced out after just 11 days on the job, said in an interview on Monday that he remains in close touch with the White House.

    He told The Associated Press that although he has not spoken to Donald Trump in over a month, he talks to members of the president's inner circle "regularly" and sees himself working with Trump again in the future.

    "I have very good relationships there still, and you have to remember we were a team for 18 months, and so we all had different roles. And so I'm still playing my role frankly. I'm an advocate for the president, media surrogate when I need to be," Scaramucci said.

    Anthony Scaramucci’s Short Stint at the White House

    [NATL] Anthony Scaramucci’s Short Stint at the White House

    Anthony Scaramucci spent less than two weeks as the White House communications director. Here is a look at some of the most talked about moments during his short tenure at the White House.

    (Published Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017)

    Scaramucci is in Israel this week as a guest of the Orthodox Jewish Chamber of Commerce, a U.S.-based group that works with professionals, politicians and community leaders to stimulate business opportunities and influence public policy.

    Scaramucci, a former Wall Street financier and successful entrepreneur, is not Jewish but said he has longstanding ties with members of the group from New York and is scouting out Israel's vibrant high-tech sector for possible future opportunities.

    While he said he is currently focused on his business dealings, he expects to help Trump on his re-election campaign.

    "At some point I'll probably be more involved from the outside, but more in a re-election capability than from inside the administration," he said.

    Scaramucci, a member of Trump's campaign and transition teams, was appointed White House communications director in July. But he was fired just days into the job after he gave an expletive-laced interview to The New Yorker and made derogatory statements about several members of the Trump administration.

    In the interview, he was very vocal about unauthorized leaks coming out of the White House. The primary targets of his angry interview, the chief of staff at the time, Reince Priebus, and then-chief strategist Steve Bannon, have since left the administration.

    'Late Night': Closer Look at the Fallout of the WH Shake-Ups

    [NATL] 'Late Night': Closer Look at the Fallout of the White House Shake-Ups

    Seth Meyers takes a look at how the White House has been dealing with its recent staff changes, including the firing of Anthony Scaramucci and the appointment of John Kelly to chief of staff.

    (Published Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017)

    Scaramucci, in a dark blue suit, blue tie and crisp white shirt, joked that he had expected his term at the White House to have a longer shelf life than a "carton of milk."

    But he said that is politics and he has no regrets. He even said his term was successful in a way because he helped bring the issue of unauthorized leaks under control.

    "We identified quickly who many of the leakers were, and they're gone," he said. "You and I both know the leaks are down substantially. And that's a positive thing for the president."