Sampling Supreme: Notes from Taste of Farmers Market - NBC Southern California

Sampling Supreme: Notes from Taste of Farmers Market



    Sampling Supreme: Notes from Taste of Farmers Market
    The Original Farmers Market
    Happy people at Monsieur Marcel's. Marcel's did a cheesecake/raspberry thing on a stick for Taste of Farmers Market. Delicious.

    The Original Farmers Market at Third & Fairfax, rightly dominates a lot of the culinary conversations in Los Angeles. After all, many of our top chefs at the tip-toppiest restaurants around town swing by the market to pick up fancy cuts of beef and nose-stinging(-in-a-good-way) horseradish and all the edible elements they require to make their famous meals famouser.

    So that makes Farmers Market the famousiest of all, in our books, when it comes to a wide variety of quality foods. With that in mind we wandered, along with many, many people, among the striped awnings and quaint stalls, at Taste of Farmers Market. The Tuesday, July 14th event saw hordes of happy strollers, fully be-wrist-banded and be-Farmers-Market-mapped, snacking on small bites throughout the landmark.

    This is a place we eat at a lot. And yet, no surprise, we ended up trying several tasties that were previously unknown to us. You too? Probably, if you were there. "I had no idea ___ was served at ___!" was a commonly heard exclamation.

    Three bites to recommend: the Nancy Silverton sliders at Huntington Meats. The well-known butcher shop of course doesn't grill up burgers, usually, but they do sell Mozza honcho Nancy Silverton's burger blend. Good meat. Luscious.

    Two: The watermelon-mint juice at Eple. It was like drinking a July sunset straight from a glass. Refreshing mentally, physically, and spiritually.

    Three: The special Farmers Market honey-blonde ale, found at 326. Also refreshing, but much, much sudsier.

    Okay, and four: The Du-Par's chicken pot pie. It was a warm night to be digging into something so crusty and steamy, but we'll definitely be back, napkin tucked into collar, when the weather regains its snap.