E. Hollywood Group Unhappy About Teardown Plan - NBC Southern California

E. Hollywood Group Unhappy About Teardown Plan

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    A reader forwarded the web site for the Eastwood Coalition, a neighborhood web site for East Hollywood. And the people at the Eastwood Coalition are unhappy: They accuse the nearby Immaculate Heart School on Franklin Avenue of plotting to tear down a cottage at 1912 Franklin Avenue, pictured. Worse, they say the school will do it without getting a permit. The worry seems to be what will happen to area housing prices if this house is torn down. This is what the text on the web site reads:

    If the school tears down the house, all the properties will suffer a loss in property values. Breaking an R-1 Zoning reduces the value of everyone’s property. Potential purchasers do not want to buy on a street, when they cannot rely on the zoning. All the homeowners could join together to file one lawsuit against the school seeking compensation for their decreased property values. Lawsuits, however, are time-consuming and aggravating. On the other hand, if the school acts illegally and the homeowners do sue, that would make any future violators think very seriously about illegal demolitions. Right now, people violate the law because they think they can get away with it.

    We didn't speak to anyone at the Eastwood Coalition, but we did talk to Julie McCormack, principal of Immaculate Heart School. "We are in the process of applying for permits to destroy the building," she said, adding that she hope to have the permit within a week.

     

    The school owns the property, and the house, said McCormack, poses a danger because the foundation is slipping. She says the school doesn't know what they'll do with the land once the house is torn down, but it may be considered for a parking lot. She also said she hopes to meet with local residents and come to some sort of understanding about the situation.

    It's not clear to us if any zoning rules are being broken, but perhaps both sides can keep everyone updated.

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