WeHo Reacts to Prop 8 Ruling, Looks Ahead to Appeals

Same-sex marriage has had a bumpy ride in California

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals found California's ban on gay marriage unconstitutional Tuesday.

    Everyone gathered at West Hollywood City Hall was happy about Tuesday’s ruling that deemed the Prop 8 ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional, but knew it would ultimately come down to those nine robed justices in Washington, D.C.

    "We know the other side has the opportunity to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court," said Mayor John Duran.

    Gay Marriage "Poster Couple" Divorcing

    [LA] Gay Marriage "Poster Couple" Divorcing
    When gay couples first sought the right to legally wed in California, they argued that they were entitled to all of the benefits of marital bliss. It was only a matter of time before that benefit extended to the right to split up.

    Document: Court Ruling

    Some are nervous about the potential for an even longer legal battle.

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    [LA] "It All Started Here in West Hollywood," Says Mayor
    West Hollywood Mayor John Duran reacts to a federal appeals court ruling that Proposition 8, California's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage, is unconstitutional.

    "I have a lot of trepidation about the U.S. Supreme Court," said Mayor Pro-Tem Jeffrey Prang, who is one of the few legally married gay men in California. "If they rule against us, it could be years before we turn this thing around."

    Both sides have a reason to be nervous. Some supporters of same-sex marriage think the 9th Circuit Court’s rejection of Proposition 8 was so specific to California, they’re hoping the high court won’t take the case.

    Prop 8 supporters are banking on the court’s conservative majority to reverse the more liberal 9th Circuit.

    Since 2000, California banned, then legalized, banned again, and then overturned the ban on same-sex marriage – a rollercoaster battle, the core of which is grounded in defining the term "marriage."

    "Words do matter in the end in providing people human dignity and equal treatment under the law," Duran said.

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