Prop 8 Opponents Concede the Election

Vow the Fight for Same Sex Marriage is Not Over

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    Brenda Chavez, left and Carissa Morales watch a No on Prop 8 rally in Fresno, Calif. Proposition 8 was passed on Nov. 4 and overturned the California Supreme Court's decision earlier this year to legalize same-sex marriage.

    Opponents of a ballot measure to end gay marriage in California conceded defeat Thursday -- two days after voters repealed a state Supreme Court decision that has allowed same-sex couples to wed since May.

    With all precincts in the state counted, Proposition 8 was leading by a 52.5 percent to 47.5 percent margin. Opponents had held out hope that they could overcome a 400,000 deficit when provisional and absentee ballot were counted.

    But during a telephone conference with reporters, opponents acknowledged that waiting for the final tally would be fruitless.

    "While we think the margin will close, we are convinced that we will not be able to overcome what the current small deficit is and that Prop. 8 will pass," said Geoff Kors, a member of the executive NO on Proposition 8 Committee.

    In the meantime, a crowd of several hundred Proposition 8 opponents had gathered outside the Church of Latter Day  Saints in Westwood.    

    The crowd surrounded a news conference being held by those vowing to fight the newly passed consitutional amendment.  Protestors were waving posters  and carrying signs in support of same sex marriages.

     A line of police surrounded the protest.  Some protestors began marching from the church, saying they were planning to head to the Federal building in Westwood.

    Officers began shutting down freeway ramps along the 405, presumably in response to the sudden protest march.