Daily Border Crossings by Undocumented Migrants Hit 13-Year Highs - NBC Southern California
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Daily Border Crossings by Undocumented Migrants Hit 13-Year Highs

On March 19, CBP officers and agents stopped or apprehended 3,974 immigrants, the highest single day since the beginning of the Trump administration

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    5 Reasons to Consider a Career-Focused MBA Program
    Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images
    A group of about 30 Brazilian migrants who had just crossed the U.S. border with Mexico get into a U.S. Border Patrol van in southern New Mexico on Wednesday, March 20, 2019.

    Daily attempts by undocumented immigrants to cross into the United States from Mexico over the past month surpassed daily averages not seen since fiscal year 2006, according to Customs and Border Protection data obtained by NBC News.

    The surge has maxed out the capacity of existing detention centers, and the Department of Homeland Security is now in negotiations with the Department of Defense to detain and care for the overflow on U.S. military bases, according to a DHS official and two other U.S. officials familiar with the discussions.

    On March 19, CBP officers and agents stopped or apprehended 3,974 immigrants, the highest single day since the beginning of the Trump administration. Six other days since mid-February have topped 3,595, surpassing the daily average of 3,530 in fiscal year 2006.

    Those seven days are the highest on record since President Donald Trump took office, a DHS official told NBC News, and they have all been recorded over the past six weeks.

    Migrants React to Trump's Prime-Time Push for Border Wall

    [NATL] Migrants React to Trump's Prime-Time Push for Border Wall

    Migrants from Mexico to Honduras are refuting claims made by President Donald Trump in his prime-time address, in which he defended his demand for a wall on the southern border with Mexico by alleging that undocumented immigrants bring crime and drugs into the U.S. at high rates.

    (Published Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019)