The trial of Michael Jackson's personal physician

Conrad Murray Trial: The Jurors

The identities of the jurors have been protected, but during the trial journalists were able to learn a bit about the twelve men and women who determined the fate of Dr. Conrad Murray.

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    The jury in the Murray case was so well protected from the spotlight, even the lawyers didn't know their names, just their juror numbers.

    They were bused in and out together from a secret parking lot every day, and kept in the jury room for lunch.

    Conrad Murray Trial: The Jurors

    [LA] Conrad Murray Trial:  The Jurors
    The identities of the jurors have been protected, but during the trial journalists were able to learn a bit about the twelve men and women who determined the fate of Dr. Conrad Murray.

    Still, there were people in the courtroom who got to know them very well.

    Associated Press Special Correspondent Linda Deutsch has been referred to as the Queen of the Court in Los Angeles journalism, and she was front row, center, for every day of the Murray trial.

    "I watched them constantly, and they were the most focused jurors I think I've ever seen," according to Deutsch. "There were never any drooping eyelids, never any looking at the ceiling. They were never out of touch with what was going on."

    The seven man, five woman jury took notes. Many kept lists of the evidence, and they were on time every day.

    Every evening when the judge admonished them to avoid the news media and not talk about the case, Deutsch said, they nodded their heads like it was the first time they heard it, although many had been on juries before.

    And the fact that juror #3 became the foreperson was no surprise to one journalist.

    "Juror #3 was going to be the one," predicted writer Terri Harris. "He was very attentive throughout the entire trial."

    Harris was at the trial every day too and noted the jury reaction when the verdict was read.

    "They weren't all excited," according to Harris. "They realized that a mother lost her son. Brothers and sisters lost a brother, and most importantly, children lost their father."

    The jury has been told that they could now speak to anyone they wanted to about the case, but they have to wait 90 days before they make any money for it.

    Were you a juror on the Murray trial or do you know someone who was, and who might want to share their story? Contact us at isee@nbclosangeles.com.