Family, Stolen Dog Reunited After 7 Years Thanks to Microchip | NBC Southern California
Clear the Shelters

Clear the Shelters

Finding Forever Homes Across the Country on Aug. 19, 2017

Family, Stolen Dog Reunited After 7 Years Thanks to Microchip

The family pet went home with owner Shannon and her three daughters Tuesday

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    A Bakersfield family reunited with their pit bull, Kona, who has been missing for seven years since she was stolen from their backyard. Video broadcast Tuesday, June 6, 2017.

    (Published Wednesday, June 7, 2017)

    Pet microchipping led to a heartwarming reunion Tuesday for a Southern California family and their dog, who finally returned home seven years after she was stolen.

    Kona, an 8-year-old pit bull, was dropped off by animal control at Ventura County Animal Services (VCAS) Saturday in Camarillo, where workers scanned her for a microchip implant that led to her owner, Shannon Pratt.

    The last time Pratt and her family saw Kona was seven years ago when the then-1-year-old pit bull was stolen from their backyard in Ventura County, according to VCAS. The family has since moved to Bakersfield and Kona's collar was left behind.

    Upon receiving the good news from VCAS, Pratt and her daughters drove to Ventura County to pick up Kona.

    Tuesday's emotional reunion, which was streamed live on VCAS' Facebook, shows Pratt and her three daughters happy to be reunited with Kona.

    "It's just the best feeling when the microchip scanner beeps," said VCAS director Tara Diller. "It means the pet has a microchip, and the chances of reuniting pets with their owners increases exponentially."

    Even though a microchip implant dramatically increases the likelihood of locating a pet's owner, the vast majority of lost pets do not have these implants, according to VCAS spokesman Randy Friedman.

    This is also true of the lost pets at the Camarillo Animal Shelter. Few animals there have microchips, making it difficult to locate owners and move animals out of the shelter. The Camarillo shelter currently offers shelter to 240 animals, almost 100 animals more than its intended 150-animal capacity. The shelter has been far over capacity since it became a "no-kill" facility in 2014, Friedman said.

    Unbelievable Animals: Ultramarathoning Dog Scores Movie DealUnbelievable Animals: Ultramarathoning Dog Scores Movie Deal

    Microchip implants are the size of a grain of rice and last a lifetime, making them a "game changer" for lost pets, Friedman added.

    Animal services officials especially urge owners to microchip their pets as July 4 nears. Friedman said that having a microchip implant will increase the chance that a pet will be returned if it gets lost after running from fireworks.

    VCAS offers microchip implants for $10 at low-cost vaccination clinics that are held at different sites each month. Implants are offered for free for pets that were lost and have been returned to their owners.

    Get the latest from NBC4 anywhere, anytime

    • Download the App

      Available for IOS and Android