Noah Cuatro

Newly-Released Transcripts Provide More Details of Noah Cuatro Case

Hundreds of exhibits and documents formed part of the Grand Jury transcripts of the case against 4-year-old Noah's parents.

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Newly-released Grand Jury transcripts are giving the public a clearer picture of what prosecutors believe happened to 4-year-old Noah Cuatro, whose mother and father are accused of killing him in 2019.

The boy's parents, Jose Cuatro and Ursula Juarez, told investigators their 4-year-old drowned in their Palmdale apartment complex pool in July of 2019.

Hundreds of exhibits and documents, including a never-before-seen video of Jose Cuatro demonstrating to a Los Angeles County Sheriff's investigator what he says he did when Noah stopped breathing, formed part of the Grand Jury transcripts of the case against the parents. Both were charged with torture and murder -- the father with an additional sexual abuse charge.

A final medical report included in the transcripts was among the documents calling Noah's death a "homicide" by "asphyxiation," also indicating "blunt force trauma." A physician who examined Noah testified that the boy had no indication of drowning -- his hair was dry and there was no water in his lungs.

A child abuse expert also confirmed what initial attending physicians first reported, a tear and active bleeding coming from the boy's behind, according to the documents.

Prosecutors say that on July 5, 2019, the little boy soiled his shorts, which angered his father who then beat and suffocated Noah and allegedly sexually abused him, according to the transcripts. Prosecutors say that Jose Cuatro did not believe Noah was his son and targeted him.

The autopsy report shows traumatic injuries of varying ages including several healing ribs, scattered bruises and internal injuries, including a liver laceration.

Just two months before Noah's death, the child's social worker with the LA County Department of Children and Family Services requested to remove the boy from the parents' home. As NBC4's I-Team reported, the request was approved by a judge but never carried out.

The social worker made another call the following month with new allegations of sexual abuse against Noah and domestic violence in the home. The DCFS told the I-Team that it was investigating the claims and trying to meet with the family before he died.

After Noah's death, social workers and supervisors must now consult with the head of the DCFS before deciding if a removal order will not be carried out. DCFS says the director has not approved not executing a removal order since that policy change.

Noah's parents are back in court in September. One of the defense attorneys said they do not comment on pending cases.

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