Statistics Show Hispanic Population Growing in the U.S. - NBC Southern California

Statistics Show Hispanic Population Growing in the U.S.

Statistics also showed that Garcia was the sixth most common surname in the country

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Hispanic Surnames Among Top in U.S., Signaling Shift

    There are more than 56 million Hispanics in the U.S, making Latinos the fastest growing minority in the country. For the first time in years, the top 15 surnames in the U.S, include six Hispanic last names. NBC 7's Katia Lopez-Hodoyan explains what this shift in demographics means. (Published Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2016)

    Six out of the top 15 surnames in the United States are Hispanic, according to the U.S. Census.

    Statistics also showed that Garcia was the sixth most common surname in the country. 

    But experts say the shift is not due to immigration but rather from second and third generation Hispanics in the U.S.

    According to a Pew Research Study, there are more than 15 million Hispanics, making up approximately 30 percent of the population.

    San Diego is one of the cities home to a large Hispanic Population.

    Ysabel Jaimes, a Chula Vista resident told NBC 7, she believes she would not be the person she is today without having the experience of growing up in a diverse area.

    "I'm a student at San Diego State and it's great to see so many different cultures come together," Jaimes said.

    Studies also showed that while second and third generation Hispanics may speak Spanish with their family, the majority prefer English as their main language.

    "Mostly I feel more comfortable speaking English. That's what I grew up in school and stuff," Lindsay Rosas told NBC 7.

    “As I started growing up, I kind of started losing touch with Spanish. I didn't practice it as much because my parents they were used to me talking English, but they respond to me in Spanish. So I understand it, but my Spanish speaking abilities aren't that great,” Jaimes said.

    She said her parents were born in Mexico but she was born in the U.S.

    But one teacher said being bilingual can also pose a challenge in education and students may have a difficult time not excelling at either.

    "They think it's important to keep that language and they don't teach them the English language," said Kristy Acero, a bilingual teacher.

    The shift in demographics also brought in more first time Hispanic voters than ever during the presidential election.

    According to the U.S. Census, the Hispanic population is set to increase to 106 million people by the year 2050.