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A Journalist, A Museum Manager and Sign of Hope for Refugees Fleeing Ukraine

"It's never easy really because you you really don't know what the next day will bring," said Jovita Matijevska a museum manager from Poland who's working to house Ukrainian refugees.

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As the number of Ukrainian refugees climbs to over 3.2 million according to the United Nations Refugee Agency, the struggle to house the displaced men, women and children becomes more daunting.

An unlikely bond has formed, though, in an effort to meet the staggering demand.

Daria Sementko is a journalist from Kyiv, the capital of Ukraine.

Jovita Matijevska is a museum manager from Poland.

Their share a common goal of finding refugees new homes as quickly as possible for as long as possible.

With nearly 2 million people are seeking refuge in Poland as of Friday, Sementko and Matijevska are making phone calls to connect people to volunteer drivers, resources for food food and places to stay.

"Here in Poland, a lot of people, they actually wanted to help Ukrainians," said Sementko.

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However, they can't have the right answers all the time.

"It's never easy really because you you really don't know what the next day will bring," said Matijevska.

Nor do they always know who will seek their help.

Sisters Diana, 13, and Mariana, 6, fled their home in Ukraine after the bombings started.

“We woke up from explosions at 5 a.m. and went to our countryside house. We lived there [for] eight days in the basement. And then we came here in Poland, and now we are on the way to Germany," said Diana in a translated statement.

For the most part, though, Sementko said mothers and their children ask for their help.

While they work tirelessly, often helping people who've had so much taken away from them, Sementko and Matijevska say the support they receive from the global community, including SoCal, makes a difference.

"Every country now, we received a lot of help and ... it's huge and I actually, as a Ukrainian, I feel it -- I feel support of the people," said Sementko.

To find out how to support Ukraine safely and securely, this consumer report can help make sure your donations get to the people who need it.

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