USC

More Women Sue USC Alleging Gynecologist Abused Them

More than 200 women have filed reports with police alleging sexual misconduct by Tyndall during medical exams at the campus health center.

Thirty more women have come forward with allegations that they, too, were sexually abused by Dr. George Tyndall, the former USC campus gynecologist who has been accused of sexual harassment and abuse by scores of women during his three-decade tenure, including one plaintiff who says the physician compared her to an Olsen twin.

The complaint, filed against the physician and USC Monday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, alleges female students were forced to seek medical treatment from Tyndall as the only full-time gynecologist at the Engemann Student Health Center despite the university's knowledge of numerous complaints of Tyndall's sexually abusive behavior toward female patients on campus.

More than 200 women have filed reports with police alleging sexual misconduct by Tyndall during medical exams at the campus health center.

Hundreds of women have also sued the doctor and USC, contending the university was aware of complaints about Tyndall's behavior but failed to take any action.

Tyndall, 71, left the university two years ago amid an investigation into his activities.

USC officials have denied any coverup, and Tyndall has denied any wrongdoing.

“Wow, has anyone ever told you that you look like an Olsen twin?,” Tyndall told a plaintiff in 2004 who is now 33 years old, according to the new suit. “You're so cute, like an Olsen twin.”

Tyndall's remarks were in reference to twin sisters Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, both of whom are fashion designers and former child actresses.

In the 1990s, Tyndall told another plaintiff who is now 46 years old that “Asian women are better in bed,'' the suit alleges.

The plaintiffs in the multiple lawsuits allege USC protected its own reputation and financial interests by not only granting Tyndall unfettered sexual access to female students and actively concealing complaints of his sexual abuse, but by paying Tyndall a financial settlement so that he would resign.

USC's 2016 investigation revealed that Tyndall routinely made sexually and racially inappropriate remarks to patients, kept a secret box full of photographs of his patients' genitals and had documented complaints against him dating back to at least 1988, the suits allege.

Copyright CNS - City News Service
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