Trump: 'I Don't Believe' Government Climate Report Finding - NBC Southern California
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's presidency

Trump: 'I Don't Believe' Government Climate Report Finding

The climate report warned that natural disasters are worsening in the United States because of global warming

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Trump: 'I Don't Believe' Government Climate Report Finding
    Andrew Harnik/AP
    President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., and then on to Mississippi for rallies.

    President Donald Trump on Monday rejected a central conclusion of a dire report on the economic costs of climate change released by his own administration.

    But economists said the National Climate Assessment's warning of hundreds of billions of dollars a year in global warming costs is pretty much on the money.

    Just look at last year with Hurricanes Harvey, Maria and Irma, they said. Those three 2017 storms caused at least $265 billion in damage, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    The climate report, quietly unveiled Friday, warned that natural disasters are worsening in the United States because of global warming.

    Trump Staffers Brace for Mueller Report

    [NATL] Trump Staffers Brace for Mueller Report

    Some former and current White House staffers who cooperated with Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian election meddling and President Donald Trump are worried that they may be exposed in his report that's set to be released Thursday. 

    (Published Wednesday, April 17, 2019)

    It said warming-charged extremes "have already become more frequent, intense, widespread or of long duration." The report noted the last few years have smashed U.S. records for damaging weather, costing nearly $400 billion since 2015.

    "The potential for losses in some sectors could reach hundreds of billions of dollars per year by the end of this century," the report said. It added that if emissions of heat-trapping gases continue at current levels, labor costs in outdoor industries during heat waves could cost $155 billion in lost wages per year by 2090.

    The president said he read some of the report "and it's fine" but not the part about the devastating economic impact.

    "I don't believe it," Trump said, adding that if "every other place on Earth is dirty, that's not so good."

    Nearly every country in the world in 2015 pledged to reduce or slow the growth of carbon dioxide emissions, the chief greenhouse gas.

    "We're already there," said Wesleyan University economist Gary Yohe, who was a reviewer of the national report, which was produced by 13 federal agencies and outside scientists. "Climate change is making a noticeable impact on our economy right now: Harvey, Florence, Michael, Maria."

    AG Barr: ‘I Think Spying Did Occur’ on 2016 Trump Campaign

    [NATL] AG Barr: ‘I Think Spying Did Occur’ on 2016 Trump Campaign

    Attorney General William Barr was asked why he has a team looking into why the FBI opened an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. He said he thought that “spying did occur” on the Trump campaign. “The question was whether it was adequately predicated,” he said.

    (Published Wednesday, April 10, 2019)

    Yohe said, "It is devastating at particular locations, but for the entire country? No."

    Economist Ray Kopp, a vice president at the think tank Resources For the Future and who wasn't part of the assessment, said the economics and the science in the report were absolutely credible.

    "I believe this is going to be a devastating loss without any other action-taking place," Kopp said Monday. "This is certainly something you would want to avoid."

    Earlier, the White House had played down the report. Spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said in an emailed statement that the report "is largely based on the most extreme scenario, which contradicts long-established trends by assuming that, despite strong economic growth that would increase greenhouse gas emissions, there would be limited technology and innovation, and a rapidly expanding population. "

    Throughout the 29-chapter report, scientists provide three scenarios that the United Nations' climate assessments use. One is the business-as-usual scenario, which scientists say is closest to the current situation. That is the worst case of the three scenarios. Another would envision modest reductions in heat-trapping gases, and the third would involve severe cuts in carbon dioxide pollution.

    For example, the $155 billion a year in extra labor costs at the end of the century is under the business-as-usual scenario. Modest reductions in carbon pollution would cut that to $75 billion a year, the report said.

    White Nationalism, Fueled by Social Media, on Global Rise

    [NATL] White Nationalism, Fueled by Social Media, Rising on Global Scale

    Hate speech and vitriol were under the microscope on Capitol Hill Tuesday, at the center of a House Judiciary hearing on white nationalism and the internet. Analysts say white nationalism is on the rise across the country and around the world.

    (Published Wednesday, April 10, 2019)

    The report talks of hundreds of billions of dollars in economic losses in several spots. In one graphic, it shows the worst-case business-as-usual scenario of economic costs reaching 10 percent of gross domestic product when Earth is about a dozen degrees warmer than now with no specific date.

    Yohe said it was unfortunate that some media jumped on that 10 percent number because that was a rare case of hyperbole in the report.

    "The 10 percent is not implausible as a possible future for 2100," Yohe said. "It's just not terribly likely."

    Kopp, on the other hand, said the 10 percent figure seems believable.

    "This is probably a best estimate," Kopp said. "It could be larger. It could be smaller."

    Associated Press writer Jonathan Lemire contributed to this report.

    Attorney General Says Mueller Report Ready for Release ‘Within a Week’

    [NATL] Attorney General Says Mueller Report Ready for Release ‘Within a Week’

    Attorney General William Barr took questions about special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia report during his appearance in front of the House appropriations subcommittee. Barr would not answer whether the White House had seen or been briefed on the Mueller report.

    (Published Tuesday, April 9, 2019)