105 Freeway Closes Temporarily for Movie Shoot

A portion of the eastbound lanes of the 105 Freeway will be shut down on Friday night and Sunday for a movie shoot.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A portion of the eastbound lanes of the 105 Freeway will be shut down on Friday night and Sunday for a movie shoot.

    Lights, camera-car, action!

    The California Highway Patrol led a movie crew out of a parking lot on Friday night onto the south side of the Los Angeles International Airport and onto the eastbound 105 freeway. The mile plus stretch is reserved until 7am Saturday morning for a theatrical film shoot.

    The title is top secret, but the crew boards say Paqu, the name of Uma Thurman's character in an upcoming Oliver Stone-crime drama.

    Shooting on the freeway requires diverting eastbound traffic onto adjacent Imperial Highway and the entire shoot was permitted by the California Film Commission.

    105 Freeway Temporary Closed for Movie Shoot

    [LA] 105 Freeway Temporary Closed for Movie Shoot
    A portion of the eastbound lanes of the 105 Freeway will be shut down on Friday night and Sunday for a movie shoot.

    James Fitzpatrick, the Deputy Director of the California Film Commission said, "the inconvenience is always there."

    Fitzpatrick said the goal is to minimize the disruption as much as possible.

    "We want the public to be notified. We do not want to delay the public and we never close, in this case, the 105 westbound is never closed, never. So you will not miss your airplane going to the airport," said Fitzpatrick.

    The west end of the 105 freeway is one of a handful of locatoins where filming is permitted, simply because closures at the end of a freeway are less disruptive than in the middle of one, for example, the Carmageddon scenario in the middle of the Sepulveda pass.

    Fitzpatrick said, "because the way the freeway is built, it doesn't affect a lot of the traffic that's flowing towards the 405."

    Busy weekend for the eastbound 105, west of the 405. On Sunday it will be closed much of the time from 5am to 8pm for a commercial shoot.

    The filmmakers pay the cost of the CHP officers, but the film commission does not charge a fee for the permit. The idea is to encourage film makers to stay in California and keep entertainment our biggest export.