Women's Marches Attract Masses Across the Globe | NBC Southern California
Donald Trump's First 100 Days in Office

Donald Trump's First 100 Days in Office

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Women's Marches Attract Masses Across the Globe

More than 600 "sister marches" were planned across the country and abroad

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Legions of women flooded parks, streets and city squares from Sydney to Paris to Philadelphia on Saturday, marching in solidarity as a show of empowerment and a stand against Donald Trump.

    More than 600 "sister marches" were planned across the country and abroad in conjunction with the Women's March on Washington, which drew hundreds of thousands to the nation's capital a day after Trump became president of the United States.

    Alicia Keys Speaks at DC Women's Rally: 'I Rise'

    [NATL] Alicia Keys Speaks at DC Women's Rally: 'I Rise'
    Alicia Keys spoke on stage at the Women's March in Washington, DC, on Jan. 21, thanking the crowd. "Our potential is unlimited," she said. "We will not allow our bodies to be owned and controlled by men in government, or men anywhere."
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    Here's a look at some of the other rallies around the world:

    PARIS
    Several thousand people, including many American workers and students living in France, gathered in Paris for the Women's March.

    Protesters marched in the Eiffel Tower neighborhood in a joyful atmosphere, singing and carrying posters reading: "We have our eyes on you Mr. Trump," ''With our sisters in Washington", "Women's rights are human rights".

    Anne Tiracchia, from Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, was on vacation in France where her son lives. She wrote in French "Let us resist the catastrophe" on a U.S. flag.

    Scarlett Johansson Touts Planned Parenthood at DC Rally

    [NATL] Scarlett Johansson Touts Planned Parenthood at DC Rally
    Speaking at the Women’s March in Washington, DC, actress Scarlett Johansson shared a personal anecdote about Planned Parenthood, on Jan. 21.
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    "It's important because Trump wants to destroy 50 years of progress, he wants to go back to smoke coming out of factories and women staying home and having babies," she said. "He won't change. He doesn't care. But we have to show we don't agree with him".

    More than 40 feminist and anti-racist groups organized the Paris march.

    SYDNEY
    Demonstrators flooded a popular central Sydney park carrying placards with slogans including "Women of the world resist," ''Feminism is my trump card" and "Fight like a girl."

    Organizer Mindy Freiband told the crowd hatred, bigotry and racism are not only America's problems.

    "This is the beginning of something, not the end," she said.

    Protester Alyssa Smith, who came with her husband and 2-year-old daughter, said she worried about the future after Trump's election. She said she didn't want her daughter growing up in the world "where hatred is commonplace, where people think it's OK to persecute minorities."

    Charlotte Wilde said she shed tears watching Trump get sworn in. The 33-year-old said the businessman's rise to the presidency left her in a state of horror, and attending Saturday's rally was a way to feel empowered.

    A plane was seen skywriting "TRUMP" over the rally.

    Judd Recites Teen's Poem: 'I am a Nasty Woman'

    [NATL] Judd Recites Teen's Poem: 'I am a Nasty Woman'
    Ashley Judd recited a spoken-word poem written by Nina, a 19-year-old woman in Tennessee, at the Women's March in Washington, DC, on Jan. 21.
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    Skywriting Australia owner Rob Vance said the sign was commissioned by Trump fans who wanted to remain anonymous.

    YANGON, MYANMAR
    Dozens attended a "solidarity picnic" in Yangon organized by Alyssa Paylor of Colorado and other U.S. expats.

    "We're not able to have a march in this climate, so we wanted to just gather together in solidarity with our sisters and brothers marching in Washington and all across the world because of what we believe in," said Paylor, 26. She is in Myanmar working for an organization called Mote Oo Education for Curriculum Development.

    Paylor said Trump's election and the United Kingdom's Brexit motivated people to get involved.

    'I Can't Even See the End of the Crowd!': Michael Moore

    [NATL] 'I Can't Even See the End of the Crowd!': Moore at DC March
    Michael Moore spoke at the Women's March in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21, with a dual message of the accomplishment at the number of people who were in attendance -- hundreds of thousands across the city -- and of resistance towards the Trump presidency.
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    "I think these things have energized a lot of people and made many people, especially women, very angry about what they may have to deal with in the coming years," she said.

    PRAGUE
    Hundreds gathered in freezing weather in a busy city square in the Czech capital, waving portraits of Trump and Russia's Vladimir Putin and holding banners that read "This is just the beginning," ''Kindness" and "Love."

    "We are worried about the way some politicians talk, especially during the American elections," organizer Johanna Nejedlova said.

    COPENHAGEN
    In Copenhagen, march organizer Lesley-Ann Brown said: "Nationalist, racist and misogynistic trends are growing worldwide and threaten the most marginalized groups in our societies, including women, people of color, immigrants, Muslims, the LGBT community and people with disabilities."

    'Do Not Try to Divide Us': Steinem at DC Women's March

    [NATL] Gloria Steinem at DC Women's March: 'Do Not Try to Divide Us'
    Gloria Steinem spoke at the Women's March in Washington, DC, amidst a foggy sky and thousands of people wearing pink hats. "This is the upside of the downside," she said gesturing to the crowd. "This is an outpouring of energy and democracy like I have never seen in my very long life."
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE
    At a rally in Concord, author Jodi Picoult told the crowd, "We in New Hampshire are not in the habit of going in reverse. We have the backs of those who are less fortunate — who may be struggling for health care, for environmental rights, for racial equality, for a fair wage, for justice.

    "We are in this together. And we know that change does not come from the top down, but from the bottom up."