The Big Rainmaker is Yet to Come | NBC Southern California

The Big Rainmaker is Yet to Come

The second storm is expected to pack a bigger, wetter punch

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Steady rain doused the region early Friday but a bigger storm is just around the corner.

    The second storm is expected to pack a wetter punch when it arrives tonight, with the potential for up to 1 1/2 inches of rain in coastal areas and valleys and up to 2 1/2 inches in the mountains, said NWS specialist Stuart Seto.

    "We get the other one coming in Friday night through Sunday and that's going to be the big rainmaker, especially Saturday" Seto said.

    Overnight rain turned out to be less intense than NWS forecasters had expected except in the eastern areas of the San Gabriel Valley. A flood advisory that was to have been in effect until early this morning was canceled. But officials urged caution when driving as water begins to accumulate on freeways and intersections.

    Residents in fire ravaged areas remained vigilant. Rain and melting snow increased the risk of mud and debris flows in and below the burn areas, officials said.

    In the mountains of Los Angeles County, excluding the Santa Monica Range, a winter weather advisory was scheduled to be in effect until 9 a.m.

    Thursday's storm is projected to generated up to one-third of an inch of rain in coastal areas and 1 inch in the mountains below 6,000 feet, potentially melting some of the snow that fell earlier this week, said NWS specialist Stuart Seto.

    "The high passes will get wet, but they won't get snow," he said, although between 3 and 6 inches of snow may accumulate above the 6,000-foot level.

    Both the current and approaching systems are producing somewhat warmer temperatures than the storm that blew into the Southland out of the northwest earlier this week, said NWS Meteorologist Andrew Rorke.

    A high surf advisory will remain in effect along the Orange county coast through this afternoon. Local sets up to 9 feet are possible, along with dangerous undercurrents, NWS forecasters said.