coronavirus

Asymptomatic COVID-19 Cases May Be More Common Than Suspected

The problem? Even without symptoms, people can still spread the virus

A local artist and onlookers wear masks on the boardwalk during the Memorial Day holiday weekend on May 23, 2020 in Ocean City Maryland. - The beach front destination has lifted its COVID-19 related beach and boardwalk restrictions May 9 and lodging restrictions May 14. The state of Maryland moved from a stay-at-home order to safe-at-home order May 15. (Photo by Alex Edelman / AFP) (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

New estimates of the number of asymptomatic people with the coronavirus suggest that "silent" COVID-19 is much more prevalent than once thought, according to two studies published Wednesday.

The first study, published in JAMA Network Open, found that 42 percent of cases from a group of people in Wuhan, China, were asymptomatic. The second study, published in Thorax, found much higher rates of asymptomatic individuals: 81 percent of cases on a cruise to Antarctica.

The study from Wuhan looked at 78 patients who tested positive for COVID-19, and found that 33 of the individuals had no symptoms of the illness. These patients were more likely to be women, and more likely to be younger, in their 20s, 30s and early 40s.

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"Many people still haven't grasped the notion that asymptomatic people can be so common, and they wonder why it is they have to wear the mask when they're feeling well, or why they have to keep doing this social distancing stuff," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, said.

Read the full story at NBCNews.com

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