Epic Lemonade Stands Raises Thousands of Dollars for Borderline and Fire Victims - NBC Southern California
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Epic Lemonade Stands Raises Thousands of Dollars for Borderline and Fire Victims

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Thousand Oaks Lemonade Stand Raises Money and Spirits

    The Thousand Oaks community came out to support a fundraising lemonade stand. John Cádiz Klemack reports for NBC4 News at 11 p.m. on Nov. 18, 2018. (Dennis Lahti) (Published Monday, Nov. 19, 2018)

    A community organized an "Epic Lemonade Stand" to raise money to help victims of all the tragedies that have occurred in the last few days. Kids, mostly from schools all around Thousand Oaks, came together and helped.

    Thousands of dollars in donations were collected in just the first hour Friday.

    But Shannon Atkins, the Epic Lemonade Stand organizer didn't think that the stand was going to be so successful.

    "Well, we were pretending it was 'epic' and then it kind of turned epic on its own a little bit because I think the community really needs something to do right now," said Atkins.

    All the money collected will be going to the Ventura County Community Foundation and half and half to Borderline victims' families and fire victims.

    But seeing the young faces understanding adult problems is just one example of how the community is connecting with the victims.

    "I hope all the people that are in the world that lost their homes get repairs quick," said Brantlyn Kitzman, a little girl at the lemonade stand.

    Another girl said that it's really hard to see all these things happening in such short amount of time.

    But beyond the people at the lemonade stand, there are others that are coming together to help and support in different ways.

    Songwriter Paige Peel wrote a song to support the Borderline victims' families.

    "I feel like I was blessed with these words," Peel said. "I was just lucky enough to sing the song."

    Others, have created a Facebook page to connect with other survivors. It's like they're members of a club they never wanted to join.

    "Because it's better to be connected together than to be alone, because when you're alone you go to the dark place and think of the all the negative."

    Members of the community just want to help each other. Whether through lemonade and sweets, social media or music.

    "We are one community; we are so strong together," said Peel.