Southern California

Walk into Spider Pavilion's Web of Wonder

NHMLA's fall-famous experience has legs.

What to Know

  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
  • Sept. 15-Dec. 1
  • $5 plus your museum admission

The World Wide Web?

You've been on it at some point, to look up the spelling of "arachnophilia" or when autumn starts or how many eyes a tarantula boasts.

A web-web, as in an actual web?

You've seen it in your yard, stretching between the camellia bush and the fence. You may have even walked into a few web strings by night, as you walk your woofer around the neighborhood.

And while the web, as in the 'net, as in the ol' online world, always exists, the webbiest time of year around Southern California is happening now, as summer winds down.

And just before summer is through? Spider Pavilion will scurry back into the Natural History Museum, proverbially scurry, that is, from Sept. 15 through Dec. 1, 2019.

It's a true scintillating space o' spiderdom, a pop-up place outside of the Exposition Park science institution, one that is full of actual and real and literal spiders.

Past years have seen cameos by the pink toe tarantula and a host of orb weavers, so prepare to be astounded by the furry, lots-o'-legged wonders you encounter, and the spin-tastic food-catchers they've personally arts-and-craft'd by themselves.

It's a walk-through experience, yes, but the webs and web denizens'll remain off to the path's side.

During your visit, you can chat up "... educators about the natural pest control that spider provide" and get a in-depth look at the "enclosed habitats" of wolf spiders and other reps of the spider contingent.

Your entry? It's five bucks, in addition to your museum ticket.

Jumping onto the Web? You can find out how to reach NHMLA.

Jumping into an experience with loads of webs? You can learn a lot more about the spiders that are just outside our homes (and, yes, occasionally inside, too).

No skin-prickles or screams or phobias to fear here, just education, delight, and knowing more about these helpful, web-wonderful denizens of the larger cycle of life on this planet.

Copyright FREEL - NBC Local Media
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